ted:

This is a DNA Vending Machine.

Each of those little vials holds human DNA, with a collectible photo of the person who donated it. You can buy it just like you’d buy a Coke or a bag of chips, and then you can do…whatever. (What do you actually do with a sample of DNA?) 

TED Fellow Gabe Barcia-Colombo created the vending machine as an art installation. He gathered a bunch of his friends on Friday nights and taught them how to extract their own DNA — the weirdest/coolest dinner party idea of all time. (In the photos above, the floating white stuff is the DNA.) Then, with their permission, he sold it. 

Of course, there’s a bigger question behind all this: Who owns your DNA? And what should strangers or scientists be able to do with yours? Gabe wants to push people to think about the ethical and legal questions we’ll have to answer as access to biotechnology increases.   

What do you think, would you be willing to sell your DNA?

Watch the full talk here »

Great. So someone buys your DNA, clones you, trains your clone as an assassin, and next thing you know you’re doing hard time for your clone’s rap.

(via mymessup)

(Source: bookshavepores, via wordpainting)

writersprocrastinate:

Hi, I’m a writer. My hobbies include not writing. 

(via soylenth)

Writers have big egos. That’s the only way you continue in the face of all those rejection slips. You’ve got a thick skin and you don’t bleed maybe as much because of it. When somebody sends back a story and says, “I’m sending this back because the characterization seems wrong to me and it seems like you’ve gone off the rails at Points A and B,” you file the rejection slip….
You read the rejections, the personal letters that explain why they didn’t take the story, although they might say something good about it and part of you inside says, “Well, they were wrong.” Also, if you read a lot of stuff and you know in your heart that you write better than some of the crap that comes out you say, “Well, if I’m doing better than this and this is published, then it’s just a question of continuing to flog the things around until they find a home.

– Stephen King (via writingquotes)

Easy for him to say.

braiker:

retronewyork:

Driving through 1980 New York at Night, Times Square, Broadway

From the Kinolibrary archive film collections. To order the clip clean and high res or to find out more visit http://www.kinolibrary.com. Clip ref GW2

so great.

Above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.

– Roald Dahl (via observando)

(via streamsofcontext)


invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.
Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.

Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

(via soylenth)

terraelan:

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Beverly Cleary, born 12 April 1916
Seven Quotes
I didn’t start out writing to give children hope, but I’m glad some of them found it.
I had a very wise mother. She always kept books that were my grade level in our house.
One rainy Sunday when I was in the third grade, I picked up a book to look at the pictures and discovered that even though I did not want to, I was reading. I have been a reader ever since.
I was a great reader of fairy tales. I tried to read the entire fairy tale section of the library.
Quite often somebody will say, What year do your books take place? and the only answer I can give is, In childhood.
I don’t necessarily start with the beginning of the book. I just start with the part of the story that’s most vivid in my imagination and work forward and backward from there.
I was a very observant child. The boys in my books are based on boys in my neighbourhood growing up.
Cleary is an American author of books for young adults and children. She has sold 91 million copies worldwide. She won the 1981 National Book Award for Ramona and Her Mother and the 1984 Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Ramona remains one of my favorite characters ever, and JEAN AND JOHNNY is a YA that made my heart sing. Long live Beverly Cleary!

terraelan:

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Beverly Cleary, born 12 April 1916

Seven Quotes

  1. I didn’t start out writing to give children hope, but I’m glad some of them found it.
  2. I had a very wise mother. She always kept books that were my grade level in our house.
  3. One rainy Sunday when I was in the third grade, I picked up a book to look at the pictures and discovered that even though I did not want to, I was reading. I have been a reader ever since.
  4. I was a great reader of fairy tales. I tried to read the entire fairy tale section of the library.
  5. Quite often somebody will say, What year do your books take place? and the only answer I can give is, In childhood.
  6. I don’t necessarily start with the beginning of the book. I just start with the part of the story that’s most vivid in my imagination and work forward and backward from there.
  7. I was a very observant child. The boys in my books are based on boys in my neighbourhood growing up.

Cleary is an American author of books for young adults and children. She has sold 91 million copies worldwide. She won the 1981 National Book Award for Ramona and Her Mother and the 1984 Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Ramona remains one of my favorite characters ever, and JEAN AND JOHNNY is a YA that made my heart sing. Long live Beverly Cleary!

Instead, could you maybe kiss me well?

Instead, could you maybe kiss me well?

(via masternservant)