Above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.

– Roald Dahl (via observando)

(via streamsofcontext)


invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.
Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

invaderxan:

Mars. In true colour.

Just so you know, a lot of images of Mars which you’ll see have been manipulated. A lot of them have boosted contrast and saturation. So if you’ve ever wondered – images like this one are what Mars actually looks like.

(via soylenth)

terraelan:

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Beverly Cleary, born 12 April 1916
Seven Quotes
I didn’t start out writing to give children hope, but I’m glad some of them found it.
I had a very wise mother. She always kept books that were my grade level in our house.
One rainy Sunday when I was in the third grade, I picked up a book to look at the pictures and discovered that even though I did not want to, I was reading. I have been a reader ever since.
I was a great reader of fairy tales. I tried to read the entire fairy tale section of the library.
Quite often somebody will say, What year do your books take place? and the only answer I can give is, In childhood.
I don’t necessarily start with the beginning of the book. I just start with the part of the story that’s most vivid in my imagination and work forward and backward from there.
I was a very observant child. The boys in my books are based on boys in my neighbourhood growing up.
Cleary is an American author of books for young adults and children. She has sold 91 million copies worldwide. She won the 1981 National Book Award for Ramona and Her Mother and the 1984 Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Ramona remains one of my favorite characters ever, and JEAN AND JOHNNY is a YA that made my heart sing. Long live Beverly Cleary!

terraelan:

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Beverly Cleary, born 12 April 1916

Seven Quotes

  1. I didn’t start out writing to give children hope, but I’m glad some of them found it.
  2. I had a very wise mother. She always kept books that were my grade level in our house.
  3. One rainy Sunday when I was in the third grade, I picked up a book to look at the pictures and discovered that even though I did not want to, I was reading. I have been a reader ever since.
  4. I was a great reader of fairy tales. I tried to read the entire fairy tale section of the library.
  5. Quite often somebody will say, What year do your books take place? and the only answer I can give is, In childhood.
  6. I don’t necessarily start with the beginning of the book. I just start with the part of the story that’s most vivid in my imagination and work forward and backward from there.
  7. I was a very observant child. The boys in my books are based on boys in my neighbourhood growing up.

Cleary is an American author of books for young adults and children. She has sold 91 million copies worldwide. She won the 1981 National Book Award for Ramona and Her Mother and the 1984 Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Ramona remains one of my favorite characters ever, and JEAN AND JOHNNY is a YA that made my heart sing. Long live Beverly Cleary!

Instead, could you maybe kiss me well?

Instead, could you maybe kiss me well?

(via masternservant)

quintannabis:

quiero estar aqui


"Vaster Than Empires and More Slow"

quintannabis:

quiero estar aqui

"Vaster Than Empires and More Slow"

(Source: poetryof-motion, via mymouthcradle)

overlookpress:

Literary ghosts 

via flavorpill

A poet can survive everything but a misprint.

– Oscar Wilde (via writingquotes)

spiralheartattack:

I don’t understand the logic that whoever is calmest in an argument is winning and that somehow anger invalidates your words. I mean I can argue that your great aunt’s name is Jihinksenbob for an hour straight and be perfectly fine. It’s very easy to be calm when the topic doesn’t affect you personally or you just don’t know what the hell you’re talking about.

Coincidentally, my great-aunt’s name is Jihinksenbob.

(Source: gummysovereign, via mymessup)

Two and a half years ago, I ranted on Twitter about Superman and why it makes no sense for people to dislike him the way they do. My general feeling then was just that people had some sort of hard line aversion to identifying with someone who always tries to do the right thing, as though great power and great responsibility were peanut butter and arsenic. I mean, I get it. I used to think Captain America was weaksauce milquetoast and that he would be way cooler if he was more of an antihero. For context, however, when I thought this, my favorite filmmaker was Kevin Smith, my favorite band was Limp Bizkit, and I was a couple of years out from being really into Mark Millar. Luckily, time is less of a flat circle than Rustin Cohle would have you believe.

The point is, I grew up. I stopped being a world-hating boychild whose blood type was misplaced anger. I stopped conflating negative character traits with positive signifiers. One of the reasons people seem to criticize optimistic superheroes is because they aren’t realistic enough, but I think they’re missing the point. We created superheroes because we needed something “unrealistic” to save us. Realism is relative. The argument that a superhero who is a bit of a dick all the time is more real or interesting than one who is decent and upstanding all the time is complete bullshit. You know what’s boring? A lack of conflict.

In Defense of Supermen [Editorial] | Deadshirt (via bigredrobot)

(via soylenth)

landscapelifescape:

Angara River, Siberia, Russia

 CHO HYUNG JAE 

(via mymessup)