When I’m disappointed by a novel, why am I disappointed? And it’s really something so simple. For it to be a worthwhile novel, there has to be a reason for it to be in written language. In 1820, that was not one of the demands because there was no other option. That’s what there was as a medium. But now there are all these other mediums. I could hear a song. I could watch a film. I could be on the Internet. You have to give me a reason why you have written this down. It doesn’t have to have an elaborate literary structure. Some of the most simple books… you could make into a movie, but you would be losing something. It had to be in sentences. The sentences were necessary. That’s all people want from fiction, right? The feeling of it being necessary.

– Zadie Smith (via mttbll)

(Source: interviewmagazine.com, via oliveryeh)

wordpainting:

Designated Dreamers

wordpainting:

Designated Dreamers

treefolk:

One of my friends just posted this photo she took while hiking in Peru and I think it’s really cool.

treefolk:

One of my friends just posted this photo she took while hiking in Peru and I think it’s really cool.

ted:

Happy Earth Day! The stunning photos above show the Sacred Headwaters, a pristine area of protected land in a remote corner of northern British Columbia. The area is about the size of the entire state of Oregon, and only one tiny road winds through it. (For context, on the US mainland, the farthest you can get from a maintained road is about 20 miles. Oregon is 98,466 square miles.)

Watch the full talk here »

(via mymessup)

A chapter from my new novel appears in the latest issue of Jonathan. Pre-order here.

The awesome cover art, which I am totally in love with, is by Diego Vera.

pleoros:

Monika Bielskyte - A Place to Wash the Heart

(via jobhasnothingtolose)

r-haigh:

a totally realistic soprano part from Oliver Knussen’s second symphony #ppp #F6

What was he smoking?

r-haigh:

a totally realistic soprano part from Oliver Knussen’s second symphony #ppp #F6

What was he smoking?

One day, my dog had New Wave hair.

ted:

This is a DNA Vending Machine.

Each of those little vials holds human DNA, with a collectible photo of the person who donated it. You can buy it just like you’d buy a Coke or a bag of chips, and then you can do…whatever. (What do you actually do with a sample of DNA?) 

TED Fellow Gabe Barcia-Colombo created the vending machine as an art installation. He gathered a bunch of his friends on Friday nights and taught them how to extract their own DNA — the weirdest/coolest dinner party idea of all time. (In the photos above, the floating white stuff is the DNA.) Then, with their permission, he sold it. 

Of course, there’s a bigger question behind all this: Who owns your DNA? And what should strangers or scientists be able to do with yours? Gabe wants to push people to think about the ethical and legal questions we’ll have to answer as access to biotechnology increases.   

What do you think, would you be willing to sell your DNA?

Watch the full talk here »

Great. So someone buys your DNA, clones you, trains your clone as an assassin, and next thing you know you’re doing hard time for your clone’s rap.

(via mymessup)